YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER
Here is the latest bird report from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.
 
As daylight hours shorten, the Yellow-rumped Warbler, the last warbler to migrate out of state, may be found for just a few more weeks. Meanwhile, Snow Geese continue moving through the Champlain Valley with reports of up to 1,000 at Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area.
 
Wintering waterfowl numbers are also increasing, and wintering songbird species have begun to arrive.
 
Recent departures include OspreyRed-shouldered Hawks, and Turkey Vultures all of which leave by early November (and return around March). The Yellow-rumped Warbler, the last warbler to migrate out of state may be found for just a few more weeks.
 
Meanwhile, many of the birds primarily seen in Vermont only during migration have either mostly or fully passed through the state, including shorebirds (SanderlingGreater and Lesser Yellowlegs, and most of the Sandpipers), waterfowl (Blue-winged tealNorthern Shoveler), and songbirds (White-crowned SparrowRusty Blackbird).
 
Wintering waterfowl numbers are increasing. Lesser and Greater ScaupBuffleheadCommon Goldeneye, and other species may be found congregating where waters remain open in Lake Champlain. Though they are not common in Vermont, Lesser Scaup are the most abundant diving duck on the continent, with a population estimated at 3.8 million individuals.

Wintering songbird species have begun to arrive. Sightings are starting for Northern ShrikeHorned Lark and American Tree Sparrow. These species spend the winter here and head north each spring to breed.

While some are regular visitors, many of these species move in response to food availability—so in years when food is plentiful to the north, we may see few birds, but in years when food is scarce, we may see lots.